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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
snowden temporary asylum, the nsa surveillance program is coming under increasing criticism in washington from an unlikely bipartisan coalition. we will speak with republican huggers member thomas massie of kentucky and democratic congressman or her john conyers of michigan on their efforts to tracking everyom phone call in the united states. >> it is my fear that we are on the verge of becoming a surveillance state, collecting billions of electronic records on law-abiding americans every single day. >> then, a national strike for a living wage and the right to unionize in the fast food and retail sectors spreads across 7 cities. [indiscernible] we cannot support our families on what we make. workerill speak with one who went on strike. he is a father of three who works at both burger king and pizza hut. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration is reconsidering plans for a summit with russian president vladimir putin next month after russia granted a year of temporary asylum to national se
while the united states sought his return to face espionage charges for revealing nsa spy programs. in a statement released by wikileaks, edward snowden said -- a russian lawyer for snowden said he is set to begin a new life in russia. we will have more on snowden and the latest nsa leaks after headlines with two members of congress were trying to defined the nsa's all collection of phone and data records -- democrat john conyers of michigan and kentucky republican thomas massie. says iraq hasions closed out its deadliest month in more than five years following a wave of sectarian bombings and shootings. in total, the violence killed 1057 iraqis and injured more than 2300 in july. many of the attacks focused on iraq's shiite majority which leads the government. in egypt, supporters of former president mohammed morsi are .aunching new protests today the interimedge by government to gradually clear out morsi supporters who have been occupying cairo squares, protesters said thursday they will remain in place. we will not evacuate the square until mohamed morsi is returned to power and
with a former director of the cia and nsa general michael hayden, as well as nsa critic congressman justin amash of michigan. then washington keeps heading for a budget impasse and government shutdown. >> we've seen a certain faction of republicans in congress saying they wouldn't pay the very bills that congress racked up in the first place. >> you know, instead of working together, the president yesterday threatened to shut down the government. >> in an exclusive interview, we'll ask house majority leader eric cantor if they can make a deal before the deadline, all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington. we begin with a terror threat that has prompted the state department to arab i global issl alert for americans, and close two dozen embassies and consulates across the muslim world. we're told the al-qaeda threat is specific, but the targets are not. chief washington correspondent james rosen has the latest. james? >> chris, good morning. president obama and his national security team approached this day, the president's 52nd birthday, not in a state of celebra
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
putin. remember this image from back in june? say a little frosty you think between putin and obama? nsa leaker ed snowden has been granted asylum through vladmir putin in russia to remain there up through one year. it could be extended. perhaps after hanking out at the airport for a month 1/2. there are a lot of questions if a united states president and sit side by side with vladmir putin at a time when he granted american citizen, snowden asylum. that may not happen. at the same time the g20 summit will take place in st. petersburg, russia. we have all reason to think that will take place and there will be a moment where the president and vladmir putin will see each other and talk to each other and perhaps see a picture other than the one frozen in time. >> that will be interesting. bill: president obama speaking on the global terror threat for the first time to jay leno on late night. was the set after late-night talk show for the comments that have now closed 20 u.s. embassies? we'll debate that. >> the shooter questioning the victims. major nidal hasan with his opening statement th
begins a week-long family vacation. among the likely topics today, obamacare, the nsa, the terror threat overseas and our bumpy relationship with russia. joining me now for her take on what to expect today is monica crowley, fox news contributor. monica, always good to have you with us here on "happening now." the president, he is facing some questions today from the quote, unquote, news media as opposed to what he did the other night on tuesday with jay leno which is a softer approach. what do you think he is going to face today? >> actually jay leno asked him tougher questions. kelly: good for jay leno. >> sometimes than we see from the white house press corps, right? the president does in press conferences. he runs out the clock and take a question and tends to filibuster. i have a feeling this press conference lasts about an hour which is usually the time frame, he will run out the clock and run out the door to his vacation. i expect he will get a couple questions on nsa. for example he told jay leno earlier this week that the u.s. does not have a domestic spying program yet "the new
substantials and the n.s.a. and the i.r.s. and suddenly we get this alert that something could be happening in the arab world somewhere toward western interests, and it is pro-administration. we've heard this a million times. judge, i'm with you on this. it does look like -- >>gretchen: what if something huge does happen? i think we should keep our eye on the prize. >>steve: just that they would reveal such detail. they burned a source and a method, and that's the problem. they could still say be careful if you're in these areas. but to be so specific to make it look like the administration is working overtime, look at these fantastic avenues of intel, that is troubling. >> another scandal on a lesser scale the republican national committee is threatening to blackball nbc and cnn from the republican presidential debates if the networks don't scratch their pro-hillary clinton films. i mean, what kind of sense does this make for nbc and cbs -- >>gretchen: cnn. >> thank you. to be publishing films about hillary clinton. could you imagine if fox published one about mitt romney or george w. bush
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
in the -- matt here.matth ols olson is the current director of ct. nt foras been general counsel the nsa, acting assistant attorney general for national security, and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor at the end ctc -- the nctc is mike leiter. he was the second director of the national counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counselor to the ceo of the data analytics alantir technologies. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. why don't we begin with a very ,road question, and that is what is the current state of the threat from terrorism? where does it emanate from and how serious is it? why don't we start with you? >> it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it. we have talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. i would say right off of the top the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11.
, the father of nsa leaker wed ward snowden is speaking out, telling abc news that his son is not a traitor. and though snowden says he believes in the american justice system, he does not think his son would get a fair trial if he returns from russia. abc's susan saulny in washington tonight. >> as a father, i want my son to come home. >> reporter: today, in an exclusive interview with abc's george stephanopoulos, lon snowden, father of fugitive nsa leaker edward snowden, said plans have been made to reunite in russia. >> you're going to moscow? >> reporter: bruce fein is the family's lawyer and says it will happen very soon. >> we have visas, we have a date which we won't disclose right now because of the frenzy. >> reporter: the purpose of the trip? to come up with a criminal defense against charges of espionage. >> what i would like is for this to be vetted in open court for the american people to have all the facts. >> reporter: but the elder snowden is not convinced his son could get a fair trial. >> when you consider many of the statements made by our leaders, they have poisoned the
some time. >>> tonight, the father of nsa leaker edward snowden is speaking out, saying his son is not a traitor. and though snowden's father says he believes in the american justice system, he does not think his son would get a fair trial if he returns from russia. abc's susan saulny in washington tonight. >> as a father, i want my son to come home. >> reporter: today, in an exclusive interview with abc's george stephanopoulos, lon snowden, father of fugitive nsa leaker edward snowden, said plans have been made to reunite in russia. >> you're going to moscow? >> reporter: bruce fein is the family's lawyer and says it will happen very soon. >> we have visas, we have a date which we won't disclose because of the frenzy. >> reporter: the purpose of trip -- to come up with a criminal defense against charges of espionage. >> what i would like is for this to be vetted in open court for the american people to have all the facts. >> reporter: but the elder snowden is not convinced his son could get a fair trial. >> when you consider many of the statements made by our leaders, they have
to provide temporary asylum to the nsa leaker, edward snowden, or even russia's high-profile arrest recently of a u.s. diplomat who they have accused of being a cia spy and who they perp walked to a great effect. it's not even just russia's decision to ban american couples from adopting russian children. it's also russia's recent spate of anti-gay legislation which has drawn lots of criticism from the west, and some calls that the world should boycott the upcoming winter olympics that are due to be held in russia next year. >> i know that one question that's been raised is how do we approach the olympics? i want to just make very clear right now i do not think it's appropriate to boycott the olympics. we've got a bunch of americans out there who are training hard, who are doing everything they can to succeed. nobody's more offended than me by some of the anti-gay and lesbian legislation you've been seeing in russia, but as i said just this week, i've spoken out against that not just with respect to russia, but a number of other countries where we continue to do work with them but have a stro
's it an overreach. >>> the nsa still doesn't know exactly what former contractor edward snowden took and is now overwhelmed trying to get a handle on the damage he's brought. that's according to nbc news. the director of the agency insists they know the full amount of damage done. but nbc says two sources briefed on the matter says the nsa cannot determine just how many documents he took. >>> we're getting back to breaking news from syria this morning where there are reports of a massacre. a warning, some viewers may find these pictures very disturbing. it's not possible for cnn to independently verify the claims but activists say forces loyal to assad used chemical weapons. they say hundreds are dead and wounded. the syrian government denies all of these claims. arwa damon is live in beirut this morning. arwa, what do you know? >> reporter: it's very difficult to get accurate information out of syria, but the images that are emerging are absolutely horrific. in fact, most of so horrific, we can't air them. a lot of child images, child victims lying on the floor. doctors trying to recess tate t
may have passed, but the threat of terrorism never passed. >> they believe that the nsa surveillance programs helped track the emerging threat. the president announced some reforms on friday in those programs. and had tough words for the nsa leaker edward snowden, said he was not a patriot. take a look. >> mr. snowden's been charged with three felonies. if he believes what he did was right, then like every american citizen, electric come here, appear before the court with a lawyer, and make his case. >> so, what have you been able to learn about what u.s. officials are trying to do to get snowden right now? >> some officials i've talked to wish that a deal could be struck to bring him back to the u.s. make no mistake. one official said he has done irrefutable damage. the more t
harman, and the nsa former nsansel. -- general counsel. this is one hour, 10 minutes. >> the title of this panel, as you see, is counterterrorism, national security, and the rule of law. the tension between what the law demands and what the national defense requires is, in essence, what this panel is about. we are pleased to have one of america's premier investigative journalists. mike joined nbc news in 2010 as the national investigative correspondent. we all know he covered, among other things, the boston marathon bombing and the newtown shooting massacre. he appears regularly on nbc news. he is also the author of new york times best-selling books "hubris" and also "uncovering clinton." go ahead. >> thank you. and i want to thank you again for assembling great panels every year. you get newsmakers and future newsmakers to serve on these panels. last year, i served on a panel with paula broadwell. while i do not expect any of our distinguished panelists to make news like that this year, i think they will all be in the spotlight in some form. to my left, the general counsel of the
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
is in the wake of the edward snowden nsa scandal. it could make its way to the supreme court. first, fox senior judicial analyst, judge andrew napolitano will weigh in with tracy byrnes and ashley webster as they take you through the next hour of trading on fox business network. stay with us. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, ease? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns
it is fast and furious, whether it is benghazi, whether it is the n.s.a., you are never getting information. >>steve: some of the president's critics are saying the only reason we have heard about this particular terror threat at our embassies and diplomatic posts throughout the arab world is because in past administrations in the bush years, they never would have made such a big deal out of it. but right now the subtle message is, look, we were able to listen to this particular conversation between al-zawahiri and the guy who runs al qaeda in the arabian peninsula through the n.s.a. program so folks don't feel bad about the n.s.a. program. >> we'll wait and see what happens with this. if there is nothing that happens, we'll have to say you blew contacts, you blew sources and methods. was it to distract us from other issues. you know what makes me maddest of all? where's the media? when i was in the nixon administration, if the nixon administration had not turned over documents, you would have heard about it from every media source. they would have been screaming and crying. in this case th
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
obama spoke about a range of issues including surveillance programs at nsa and u.s./russian relations. this is about 55 minutes. >> good afternoon. these have a seat. over the past few weeks thomas i've been talking about what i believe should be our number one priority in the country. building a better bargain for the middle class and for americans who want to work your way into the middle class. at the same time i am focused on my number one priority -- keeping the american people safe. been reminded once again about the threats to our nation. as i said at the national defense university, and meeting those threats we have to strike the right balance between protecting our security and our freedoms. as part of this rebalancing, i called for review of our surveillance programs. unfortunately, rather than orderly and lawful process, the , repeated leaks of classified information has initiated the debate in a very passionate but not always informed way. i held a healthy skepticism of these programs as a senator and as president i have taken steps to make sure that they have strong overs
are warned of a terror threat. u.s. embassy a closed and al qaeda is to blame. >>> nsa leaker edward snowden who was holed up in that moscow airport since june is out. he's got a job offer and a new home. we're waiting to hear from the man accused of leaking those confidential u.s. documents. >>> the driver of that train that went off the rails in spain admits he was going twice the speed limit. welcome to "around the world." i'm suzanne malveaux. >> we missed you. i'm michael holmes. thanks for your c
memorial. >> the father of nsa leaker, edward snowden speaking out for the first time since his son gave up surveillance programs. in an exclusive interview with abc's george stephanopoulos yesterday, lon snowden wants his son edward to come home but is unsure edward could get a fair trial in the u.s. courts because he said politicians have poisoned the well of perspective -- prospective jurors. >> where my son chooses to live the rest of his life is going to be his decision. what i would like at some point in time for him to be able to come back to the u.s. whether he will live the rest of his life here or not. face this. and i believe the truth will shine through. >> snowden and attorneys have secured visas to travel to russia to meet with edward snowden. they didn't say exactly when for security reasons. neither has spoken directly to edward snowden since he fled the u.s. >> it is back to business this morning for many of the two dozen u.s. embassies and consulates shuttered by tear -- terror alert last week. mostly across the middle east. but the doors to the embassy remain locked in ye
for the reporting from cleveland. >>> nsa leaker edward snowden is free and any moment now may be speaking for the first time since russia dpragranted him a year-long asylum. apparently he's staying with some americans he met online and even has a job waiting for him if he wants it. phil black joins us live from moscow this morning. good morning, phil. >> good morning, chris. the job offer comes from a founder of a popular networking site often described as the russian version of facebook. the lawyer says he's surrounding himself by people he thinks he can trust, people who reached out to him online while stranded at the airport and he says they include american citizens. that man with his back to the camera is edward snowden and this was the moment he left moscow's airport after six weeks ther there. he's' according to his lawyer who is standing next to him in the photo. this document grants snowden permission to live in russia for one year which also keeps him beyond the reach of the united states for that time. ku kucharena describes his location as secret and safe. >> translator: he sa
. also on the show, general michael hayden, the former nsa and cia director, and an appearance by glenn downey, former executive editor of "the washington post." the sunday network tv talk shows are on c-span radio and brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. atin, rebroadcasts begin noon eastern with nbc's meet the week, 2:00, abc's this p.m., fox news sunday, 3:00, state of the union, and for clock p.m. eastern time, ace the nation from cbs. you can listen to them all on c- in thedio on 90.1 fm washington dc area. across the country, on xm satellite radio channel 119. -o online to c-span radio -- c spanradio.org. sort of anti-me suburb or person who thinks that everybody needs to live in new york city. i was very sensitive to coming across as an espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city. i was more drawn -- the trends were so undeniable, and the fact that there is a shift in the way suburban america is perceived by the people that live
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
obama's putin problem. mr. obama can't -- with russia's vladimir putin. as a consequence of the nsa leaker asylum. russia is a key american a lie in the war on terror and the u.s. may need putins cooperation to end the worsening civil war in syria. jay carney brushing aside any concerns about frosty relations just moments ago. let's watch. >> we have a lot of fish to fry, if you will, with the russians. we have a lot of issues to engage with the russians over. and there is two plus two ministerial meeting tomorrow here in washington. and you know, there will be a host of topics. >> all right. so let's debate all of this. leslie marshall, syndicated radio talk show host, mark keys an with the -- former speech writer for george w. bush. welcome to both of you. >> thanks. >> good morning. >> good morning. mark, let me begin with you. should president obama be sitting down with vladimir putin or not? >> he has no choice not to go. if he had gone, he would have looked like a complete wimp in the face of the -- we have to remember, this wasn't about snowden. made out of weakness. it was b
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
. the president talking about the n.s.a. program that led to hearing the conference call. obama: i had the programs reviewed. we put in additional safeguards for congressional oversight and federal oversight that there notice spying on americans. >> well, hmm, that ship's kind of sailed. stephanie: ok, the president again. obama: another revelation showed that no government has abused any of these powers. stephanie: that's how they got to listen to the conference call, jim, go to jihad. don't you think this whole zimmerman trial and race in america is like an eye test now, is it better or worse, better or worse. >> one or two? one or two. stephanie: up or down. which way is it facing? are we facing backward or forwards? every story, president obama met in arizona by protestors singing bye-bye black sheep. even a sign in the crowd that said impeach the half white muslim. i guess they were mad at the white part. the half white and muslim part. >> and what would be the basis for impeachment? >> because he's black. what? what did i say? what? what? stephanie: this is in the section of the
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
not have any further announcements. i am wanting to ask about the nsa's surveillance programs. the threat that they have identified help bolster the case that the surveillance is needed? >> i will not blend those two stories, or those two issues together. haveve a threat that we advised the public about. we have discussed with you in the media, and we are interacting with that threat. we have some issues with unauthorized disclosure of classified inspiration. -- information. we are in a debate about that. we have to protect our security, and the balance in providing security, and protecting privacy is something we are working on. we are working on what that threat represents, and how we can act against it paid we also want to ensure the protection and security of our american people here at home and abroad. i would not blend the two issues. operationally, if the aq kior is weakened, doesn't make it easier, or harder, in terms of all cried as ability to organize a worldwide attack? that some counterterrorism experts might be able to address this with greater detail. the al qaeda core a hea
the relationship especially in light of what's happened with edward snowden and the nsa, that relationship with, between the foreign-facing come poems, the national security facing come poems of the american be government and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically? >> well, there are two trends, scott, that are important. upside pinnings of your -- underpinnings of your question. first of all, oh the last decade -- over the last decade increasing lu the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad. and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here on privately-owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid for purposes of today, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but, of course, also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security which will always be with in the lead for the federal government, never t
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)